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Hi, I'm Iljitsch van Beijnum. I'm a freelance network architect, specializing in internet routing (BGP) and interconnection between networks (peering and more).

On this site I post both work related and somewhat less work related articles, for purely work-related information, see BGPexpert.com. Some of the blog posts here are in Dutch, others are in English.

Dubbele regenboog!

Image link - posted 2019-04-25

Dark mode!

Last year Apple introduced dark mode in MacOS. This is really nice at night because your eyeballs aren't blasted with tons of white backgrounds in pretty much all windows. Unfortunately, most web pages still use a white background. Obviously you can redesign your website to conform to dark mode, but this looks rather stark on computers in light mode.

The solution would be to have your website render dark on a system in dark mode and light on a system in light mode. As of the new version of Safari included in MacOS 10.14.4 Mojave that was released just now, you can actually do that, as you can see here. Just switch your system between light and dark mode and you'll see this webpage switch over accordingly.

I like to use this terminal command to switch between light and dark mode:

sleep 2; osascript -e 'tell application "System Events" to tell appearance preferences to set dark mode to not dark mode'

(Change the last "not dark mode" to "true" or "false" to enable or disable dark mode. The line above toggles back and forth.)

On your website you need to set up conditional CSS with media queries. This is what I use:

<style type="text/css" media="screen, print">
  body { background-color: #f0f0f0; }
  A { color: #c00000; text-decoration: underline; }
  A:visited { color: #700000; text-decoration: underline; }
  H1 { font-family: futura, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14pt; }
</style>
<style type="text/css" media="screen and (prefers-color-scheme: dark)">
  body { background-color: #202020; color: #d0d0d0; }
  A { color: #ff6734; }
  A:visited { color: #d82000; }
</style>

The first part between sets everything up for light mode, with a very light gray background.

Then the second style section (in bold) with (prefers-color-scheme: dark) overrides those earlier color settings. Note that all the font settings from the first style section are inherited by the second style section; no need to restate all of those.

That's it! Pretty cool, right?

Update: have a look here for more information, including how to use dark mode with javascript.

Permalink - posted 2019-03-26

How elastic is your network traffic?

How much bandwidth do I need? Always a hard question. It gets harder as you use more network links, and have to start considering what happens when one or more links fail, leaving you with reduced bandwidth.

The simple way to determine how much total bandwidth you need is to make a guess, and then adjust until the peaks in your bandwidth graphs stay below the 100% line. The more complex answer is that it depends on the bandwidth elasticity of the applications that generate your network traffic.

Applications are bandwidth elastic (sometimes known as "TCP friendly") when they adapt how much data they send to available bandwidth. They're inelastic when they keep sending the same amount of data even though the network can't handle that amount of data. Let's look at a few examples in more detail.

I'm assuming the bandwidth need throughout the day shown in this graph:

Between 21:00 and 22:00, normal bandwidth use reaches a peak of just over 80% of available capacity. But now we lose 25% of our bandwidth, so we have a higher bandwidth need than we can accommodate between 18:00 - 19:00 and 20:00 - 22:00, shown in red below:

Let's look at the behavior of applications with different bandwidth elasticity.

Full article / permalink - posted 2019-03-18

Een nieuw begin

Het is tijd voor een nieuwe uitdaging: na drie jaar als netwerkarchitect bij Logius begin ik vanaf 1 maart weer voor mezelf.

Hierbij richt ik me op het adviseren over connectiviteit naar het internet aan organisaties waarvoor een internetverbinding een kritisch bedrijfsmiddel is.

Hou deze plek in de gaten voor meer informatie!

Permalink - posted 2019-02-28 - English version

A new beginning

It's time for something new: after three years as a network architect at Logius, I'm going back into business for myself.

I'm going to focus on providing advice about connectivity to the internet to organizations for which an internet connection is a critical asset.

Watch this space for more information!

Permalink - posted 2019-02-28 - Nederlandse versie

Finally: native IPv6 at home!

It took a while, but I finally got native IPv6 at home from Ziggo, my cable ISP a few months ago. All it took was a new cable modem / home router, because they don't support IPv6 on the one I've had since I signed up with them six years ago. And lo and behold: I got myself some IPv6:

$ ifconfig en0
en0: flags=8863 mtu 1500
  ether xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 
  inet6 fe80::8d:5a:e4d:176f%en0 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x8 
  inet 192.168.78.24 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.78.255
  inet6 2001:1c00:d00:7300:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx prefixlen 64 autoconf secured 
  inet6 2001:1c00:d00:7300:75bf:1d31:ac76:d080 prefixlen 64 autoconf temporary 
  nd6 options=201
  media: autoselect
  status: active

Full article / permalink - posted 2018-11-11

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